About

On June 11, 2018, the City's Planning and Development Committee endorsed the Dundas Connects Master Plan, which will help guide future urban growth and intensification along the Dundas Street Corridor. The Dundas Connects Master Plan will now go to Council for approval on June 20.


The Dundas Connects Master Plan will support major improvements to transportation, land use and the public realm along the Dundas Street Corridor. Highlights of some of the recommendations in the Master Plan include:


  • Implementing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) along Dundas Street
  • Encouraging mixed-use development that supports transit
  • Creating more open spaces and community facilities
  • Maintaining existing and supporting new affordable housing
  • Maintaining four traffic lanes along Dundas Street
  • Providing safe cycling infrastructure along the length of the Dundas Street Corridor
  • Enhancing pedestrian space and providing street trees
  • Encouraging street-related retail while supporting existing businesses


What is the Dundas Corridor?


Dundas is a super street, exemplifying the City of Mississauga's diversity. Along the corridor, you'll find stores, businesses, parks, schools, churches, and beautiful neighbourhoods. Dundas is also a key part of Mississauga's transportation network, with thousands of people using it every day to move around the City.


From end-to-end, the Dundas Corridor is 4 km wide and 17 km long, stretching from Oakville in the west, to Toronto in the east. The map below highlights "focus areas" that are home to key intersections and points of interest.



Who is involved?


Dundas Connects is led by City Council, and supported by City staff. Staff teams include Planning & Building, Transportation & Works, Community Services, and Corporate Services. A consultant team, led by AECOM, and supported by SvN and Swerhun Facilitation, provides specialized expertise in land-use and development, transit and transportation, storm-water management, public policy development, and public engagement.


Want more info? Click here.



On June 11, 2018, the City's Planning and Development Committee endorsed the Dundas Connects Master Plan, which will help guide future urban growth and intensification along the Dundas Street Corridor. The Dundas Connects Master Plan will now go to Council for approval on June 20.


The Dundas Connects Master Plan will support major improvements to transportation, land use and the public realm along the Dundas Street Corridor. Highlights of some of the recommendations in the Master Plan include:


  • Implementing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) along Dundas Street
  • Encouraging mixed-use development that supports transit
  • Creating more open spaces and community facilities
  • Maintaining existing and supporting new affordable housing
  • Maintaining four traffic lanes along Dundas Street
  • Providing safe cycling infrastructure along the length of the Dundas Street Corridor
  • Enhancing pedestrian space and providing street trees
  • Encouraging street-related retail while supporting existing businesses


What is the Dundas Corridor?


Dundas is a super street, exemplifying the City of Mississauga's diversity. Along the corridor, you'll find stores, businesses, parks, schools, churches, and beautiful neighbourhoods. Dundas is also a key part of Mississauga's transportation network, with thousands of people using it every day to move around the City.


From end-to-end, the Dundas Corridor is 4 km wide and 17 km long, stretching from Oakville in the west, to Toronto in the east. The map below highlights "focus areas" that are home to key intersections and points of interest.



Who is involved?


Dundas Connects is led by City Council, and supported by City staff. Staff teams include Planning & Building, Transportation & Works, Community Services, and Corporate Services. A consultant team, led by AECOM, and supported by SvN and Swerhun Facilitation, provides specialized expertise in land-use and development, transit and transportation, storm-water management, public policy development, and public engagement.


Want more info? Click here.